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Where Is Madagascar Located

Where Is Madagascar Located

Where Is Madagascar Located

Sifaka Photograph by Hermann Erber/Photo Library Ninety percent of the plants and animals found on the island of Madagascar evolved there and nowhere else. All of the country’s 70-plus species of lemur—including this sifaka—are considered endangered. To help protect them and other unique species, the government has set aside more than nine million acres (3.7 million hectares) of land. Malagasy Vendor Photograph by Giuseppe Fallica, My Shot This mother selling bananas and bread in the central-plateau region likely can trace at least part of her ancestry back more than 2,000 years to Indo-Malayan explorers, whom evidence suggests were the first people to reach the island. Archaeologists aren’t sure whether they crossed the Indian Ocean or came overland to the east coast of Africa and then sailed from there. Avenue of the Baobabs Photograph by Jeremy Horner/Getty Images Sparse branches that grow only at the tree’s top and look more like roots than canopy give the baobab its nickname: “upside-down tree.” These smooth-trunked behemoths can reach 80 feet (24 meters) high and a stout ten feet (three meters) in diameter. Madagascar’s Avenue of the Baobabs, in the Menabe region, is one of the island’s most popular tourist destinations. Madagascar Fody Photograph by Zoltan Kovacs, My Shot The brilliant red Madagascar fody thrives in nearly every ecosystem of the country. A gregarious species, it also has a voracious appetite—one that can anger Madagascar’s rice farmers, who try to scare off the birds, trap them, and destroy their nests. Nosy Be Island Photograph by Giuseppe Fallica, My Shot Nosy Be, which means “big island” in Malagasy, is Madagascar’s largest island. Located about five miles (eight kilometers) off the country’s northwest coast, this heavily forested volcanic outcrop, fringed with brilliant reefs and turquoise waters, is one of Madagascar’s most popular tourist destinations. Malagasy Girl Photograph by Angie Rowe, My Shot Famed Irish adventure traveler Dervla Murphy once noted, “Apart from the Tibetans, I have never traveled among a people as endearing as the Malagasy.” This playful young girl walks with her family in St. Luce, a fishing village in southeast Madagascar. Malagasy Baby Photograph by Peter Velter, My Shot The bustle of a busy market in Antananarivo, Madagascar’s capital, can’t keep a Malagasy baby from a nap. Antananarivo, which means “city of a thousand warriors” in Malagasy, is home to nearly two million of Madagascar’s 20 million inhabitants. Madagascar Desert Photograph by Giuseppe Fallica, My Shot Rock outcroppings pop up in the spiny desert of southern Madagascar. The north has tropical rain forests, and the center of the country boasts high plateaus. Chameleon Photograph by Giovanni Bludzin, My Shot Nearly half the world’s 103-plus known chameleon species live in Madagascar. These unique reptiles are a study in interesting adaptations, from their pincer-shaped feet and independently movable eyes to their extremely long tongues, which can be more than twice the length of their bodies. They also have the ability to change color, a response triggered more by temperature and mood than a need for camouflage. Leaf-Tailed Gecko Photograph by Quinton Robinson, My Shot Vertical pupils identify a seseke, or leaf-tailed gecko, as a nocturnal creature. Its camouflage works so well that the lizard doesn’t have to hide during the day—it simply flattens itself against a tree trunk while waiting for darkness and insects to eat. Grand Tsingy Photograph by Stephen Alvarez/National Geographic A researcher navigates the skin-ripping pinnacles of the limestone tsingy formations in central-western Madagascar. In Malagasy, “tsingy” means “where one cannot walk barefoot.” The exact processes that carved these otherworldly stonescapes are complex and rare; only a few similar formations exist outside Madagascar. Ambozontany Cathedral, Fianarantsoa Photograph by Franck Guiziou/Hemis.fr/Aurora Photos Ambozontany Cathedral rises over the provincial capital of Fianarantsoa. The city, located in the central highlands about 180 miles (290 kilometers) south of Antananarivo, is at the center of Madagascar’s main wine- and tea-producing region. Share Email More »
where is madagascar located 1

Where Is Madagascar Located

Sifaka Photograph by Hermann Erber/Photo Library Ninety percent of the plants and animals found on the island of Madagascar evolved there and nowhere else. All of the country’s 70-plus species of lemur—including this sifaka—are considered endangered. To help protect them and other unique species, the government has set aside more than nine million acres (3.7 million hectares) of land. Malagasy Vendor Photograph by Giuseppe Fallica, My Shot This mother selling bananas and bread in the central-plateau region likely can trace at least part of her ancestry back more than 2,000 years to Indo-Malayan explorers, whom evidence suggests were the first people to reach the island. Archaeologists aren’t sure whether they crossed the Indian Ocean or came overland to the east coast of Africa and then sailed from there. Avenue of the Baobabs Photograph by Jeremy Horner/Getty Images Sparse branches that grow only at the tree’s top and look more like roots than canopy give the baobab its nickname: “upside-down tree.” These smooth-trunked behemoths can reach 80 feet (24 meters) high and a stout ten feet (three meters) in diameter. Madagascar’s Avenue of the Baobabs, in the Menabe region, is one of the island’s most popular tourist destinations. Madagascar Fody Photograph by Zoltan Kovacs, My Shot The brilliant red Madagascar fody thrives in nearly every ecosystem of the country. A gregarious species, it also has a voracious appetite—one that can anger Madagascar’s rice farmers, who try to scare off the birds, trap them, and destroy their nests. Nosy Be Island Photograph by Giuseppe Fallica, My Shot Nosy Be, which means “big island” in Malagasy, is Madagascar’s largest island. Located about five miles (eight kilometers) off the country’s northwest coast, this heavily forested volcanic outcrop, fringed with brilliant reefs and turquoise waters, is one of Madagascar’s most popular tourist destinations. Malagasy Girl Photograph by Angie Rowe, My Shot Famed Irish adventure traveler Dervla Murphy once noted, “Apart from the Tibetans, I have never traveled among a people as endearing as the Malagasy.” This playful young girl walks with her family in St. Luce, a fishing village in southeast Madagascar. Malagasy Baby Photograph by Peter Velter, My Shot The bustle of a busy market in Antananarivo, Madagascar’s capital, can’t keep a Malagasy baby from a nap. Antananarivo, which means “city of a thousand warriors” in Malagasy, is home to nearly two million of Madagascar’s 20 million inhabitants. Madagascar Desert Photograph by Giuseppe Fallica, My Shot Rock outcroppings pop up in the spiny desert of southern Madagascar. The north has tropical rain forests, and the center of the country boasts high plateaus. Chameleon Photograph by Giovanni Bludzin, My Shot Nearly half the world’s 103-plus known chameleon species live in Madagascar. These unique reptiles are a study in interesting adaptations, from their pincer-shaped feet and independently movable eyes to their extremely long tongues, which can be more than twice the length of their bodies. They also have the ability to change color, a response triggered more by temperature and mood than a need for camouflage. Leaf-Tailed Gecko Photograph by Quinton Robinson, My Shot Vertical pupils identify a seseke, or leaf-tailed gecko, as a nocturnal creature. Its camouflage works so well that the lizard doesn’t have to hide during the day—it simply flattens itself against a tree trunk while waiting for darkness and insects to eat. Grand Tsingy Photograph by Stephen Alvarez/National Geographic A researcher navigates the skin-ripping pinnacles of the limestone tsingy formations in central-western Madagascar. In Malagasy, “tsingy” means “where one cannot walk barefoot.” The exact processes that carved these otherworldly stonescapes are complex and rare; only a few similar formations exist outside Madagascar. Ambozontany Cathedral, Fianarantsoa Photograph by Franck Guiziou/Hemis.fr/Aurora Photos Ambozontany Cathedral rises over the provincial capital of Fianarantsoa. The city, located in the central highlands about 180 miles (290 kilometers) south of Antananarivo, is at the center of Madagascar’s main wine- and tea-producing region.
where is madagascar located 2

Where Is Madagascar Located

Madagascar is located in the Indian Ocean 250 miles off the eastern coast of Africa across the Mozambique Channel, just south of the equator. Over 1000 miles (1580 km) long and 350 miles (570 km) wide, Madagascar is the world’s fourth largest island. Its most prominent feature would have to be the steep mountain range paralleling the entire eastern coast. You may click here to request a brochure about Madagascar. A nature-lover’s paradise, this sparsely-populated land occupies an area more than twice the size of Great Britain, and it is crisscrossed by no less than six different micro-climates! Madagascar’s highest mountain, Mt. Maromokotro, towers an impressive 9450 feet (2876 m) over the island’s northernmost regions. The eastern slopes of Mt. Maromokofro and her numerous companions give way to a narrow coastal plain. There, you will find mighty rivers, awe-inspiring waterfalls, and the remains of an ancient rainforest. Calling Madagascar an island almost seems unfair. Deciduous forests, crystalline lakes, massive caverns, and savanna grassland dot the broad western plains, and the southern tip of the island is covered with a magnificent desert. This Eden-like garden of riches is filled with so much diversity in life and in geography that it is like no other island anywhere on Earth. Indeed, every expedition into her mountains, her rain forests, her river valleys, her coastal plains, her grasslands, her caverns, and her deserts leads to the discovery of some new plant or animal species. It is no exaggeration to claim that this micro-continent, as some have called it, offers limitless opportunities for exploration.

Where Is Madagascar Located

Where Is Madagascar Located
Where Is Madagascar Located
Where Is Madagascar Located
Where Is Madagascar Located

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